Servicemembers put much of their time, energy, and spirit into their jobs.  That sacrifice undoubtedly leads to an interest in who leads the country and what their plans are for the military.  It would be naïve to think that talk of budgets and the military doesn’t trigger various emotions.  In the midst of an election, servicemembers with stress injuries can offer feedback to fellow servicemembers who may have difficulty dealing with their frustrations. 

Power-training your mind

Building resilience involves training your mind to focus on what is important.  Refocusing on your daily needs and requirements ensures that you continue to take care of yourself, grow, and process through life.

If your response to what you see on TV leads to an argument with friends and loved ones with conflicting opinions, here are some useful tips:

  • Form your opinions about what you hear and see, and then channel those emotions into being the best you can be at work and at home.
  • Identify what you can and cannot control.  You can control your opinion about political events even if you cannot control the events unfolding on the TV screen.  Use the energy behind your opinion and apply it to things you can control like your work performance and behavior with family and friends.

Learning skills to reduce stress helps us deal with the larger stressors that life throws at us.  No candidate running for office can take that from you.  Amazing benefits come when you’re able to channel your anger and frustration into being the best you can be.

Remember, no matter what goes on in politics, you still have a life to live.  You have work to do that contributes to the mission, a spouse to continue having a meaningful relationship with, and possibly, children to raise.  These parts of your life are ongoing and will still need you when the political fervor cools down.

If you would like to discuss how to deal with political climate or any other method of coping with stress, contact your local Community Counseling Program.